Discovery of Influenza A (H7N2) in a Cat After Admission to an Animal Shelter: A Case Report

Authors

  • Elizabeth Roberts Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA https://orcid.org/0009-0005-3630-0210
  • Carolyn Allen Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6435-783X
  • Robin Brennen Animal Care Centers of NYC, New York, NY, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8867-0812
  • Aleisha Swartz Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA https://orcid.org/0009-0007-9630-3987
  • Brenda Dines Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA https://orcid.org/0009-0009-5016-0524
  • Francine Cigel Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA
  • Mary Lea Killian Department of Agriculture, National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Ames, Iowa, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8613-2009
  • Beate Crossley California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2932-7229
  • David L. Suarez Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, U.S. National Poultry Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Athens, GA, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4582-6116
  • Mia Torchetti Department of Agriculture, National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Ames, Iowa, USA
  • Christine Watson Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA
  • Sally Slavinski 7New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York, USA
  • Kathy Toohey-Kurth Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
  • Sandra Newbury Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56771/jsmcah.v2.61

Keywords:

Cat, Influenza A, H7N2, Animal Shelter, Diagnostic testing, Respiratory disease, Disease investigation, Feline, Avian Influenza, Feline Influenza, Influenza

Abstract

This case report describes the discovery of a low pathogenic avian lineage influenza A (H7N2) (A/feline/New York/16-040082-1/2016) infecting a cat in a shelter environment. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N2 had previously circulated in poultry and farmed waterfowl and had reportedly been eradicated from live bird markets in 2006. Its appearance in a cat caused concern for the local cat population and had the potential to negatively impact the agricultural industry and human health. The first cat diagnosed presented to the shelter with no apparent clinical signs. Later, conjunctivitis developed and then upper respiratory congestion, which progressed to severe pneumonia that was unresponsive to treatment and characterized by dyspnea, tachypnea, and collapse. A second cat, who had entered the shelter 17 days earlier and had died at an emergency clinic, was later considered to be the index case. The second cat had similarly arrived with no apparent clinical signs, developed respiratory congestion leading to pneumonia with tachypnea and dyspnea, and tested positive for influenza A. Clinical consultation and diagnostic testing through multiple organizations identified the virus as an avian lineage H7N2 influenza virus.

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Published

2023-10-03

How to Cite

Roberts, E., Allen, C., Brennen, R., Swartz, A., Dines, B., Cigel, F., … Newbury, S. (2023). Discovery of Influenza A (H7N2) in a Cat After Admission to an Animal Shelter: A Case Report. Journal of Shelter Medicine and Community Animal Health, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.56771/jsmcah.v2.61

Issue

Section

Case Report

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